Calendar

Jun
5
Tue
Police use of Body-Worn Cameras and the prosecution of domestic abuse: policy, practice and research @ Leeds University Business School, room 1.33
Jun 5 all-day

This event brings together policy-makers, practitioners and academics to share learning about the use of body-worn police cameras in police responses to and the prosecution of domestic abuse incidents. It will combine speaker presentations and interactive sessions aimed at learning lessons from research findings and policy and practice developments. It will showcase the research findings of an N8 Policing Research Partnership funded collaborative project of the University of Leeds, West Yorkshire Police and Cumbria Constabulary, which explored the impacts of police use of body-worn video at incidents of domestic abuse.

A particular focus of the day will be on how police and prosecuting bodies can respond more effectively and efficiently to domestic abuse incidents. It aims to strengthen and inform the process of learning from research and practice by identifying and disseminating best practice recommendations and lessons. It will be of value to practitioners and scholars who have a professional interest in the use of body-worn cameras and/or domestic abuse.

Please note that attendance at this event is free, but as space is limited we ask that only those who are sure they can attend register.

Programme

9.15-9.45Registration
10.00-10.15Welcome
10.15-11.15Mr. Stuart Lister (University of Leeds) ‘Exploring the impacts of police use of body-worn video in incidents of domestic abuse’
Respondents: Sergeant Dan St. Quinton (Cumbria Constabulary) & Sergeant Richard Hipkins (West Yorkshire Police)
11.15-12.15Sergeant Richard Cheshire (Northamptonshire Police) ‘Learning the lessons from ten years of using body-worn cameras’
Inspector Darren Norgate (West Yorkshire Police) ‘Reflections on the force-level roll-out of body-worn cameras’
Respondent: Prof. Ross Deuchar (University of West Scotland)
12.15-13.15Lunch
13.15-14.15Dr. Andy Myhill (College of Policing) ‘The role of evidence in decisions to arrest perpetrators of domestic abuse’
Supt. Katy Barrow-Grint (Thames Valley Police) ‘Attrition rates in domestic abuse: Time for a change?
Prof. Louise Ellison (University of Leeds) ‘The prosecutorial use of BWC evidence in cases of domestic abuse: opportunities and challenges’
14.15-15.00Interactive group session – Improving responses to domestic abuse: policy options and research questions
15.15-15.30Coffee break
15.30-16.00 Profs. Mike Rowe and Pam Davies (Northumbria University)
‘The Quality and Status of ‘Evidence’ in Policing: Reflections on understanding success to build capacity through innovations in policing domestic abuse’
Respondent: Dr. Sam Lewis (University of Leeds)
16.00Close

 

Police use of Body-Worn Cameras and the prosecution of domestic abuse: policy, practice and research

To book your place, please complete the following form:

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Jun
11
Mon
Improving Policing Research and Practice on Child to Parent Domestic Violence and Abuse @ Rockliffe Hall
Jun 11 @ 9:30 am – 4:00 pm

Violence and abuse committed by a person’s child or other family member has tended to be side-lined in domestic violence and abuse research and by policing. This conference brings together the key police experts, academics and practitioners who have been focusing on this important topic.

 

What this space for announcements of speakers in the next few weeks.

 

Please note that attendance at this event is free, but as space is limited we ask that only those who are sure they can attend register.

Improving Policing Research and Practice on Child to Parent Domestic Violence and Abuse

To book your place, please complete the following form:

Fields marked with an * are required
Jun
19
Tue
Fast track the impact of your research @ Howden Room, King George VI Building
Jun 19 @ 9:00 am – 1:00 pm

This session will give you everything you need to generate real-world impacts from your PhD. You will leave with practical tools you can use immediately in your research, whatever your discipline and career stage. The training is based on the latest research evidence and takes a unique relational approach to deliver wide-reaching and lasting impacts. As part of the session you will receive a copy of the acclaimed The Research Impact Handbook (275 pages) for future reference, and you will have the opportunity to sign up for follow-up support from Prof Reed.

Session 1: Introduction

• What is impact?
• Five ways your PhD can make a bigger impact

Session 2: Tools for managing and deepening impact

• Prioritising which stakeholders and publics to engage with first
• Planning for impact efficiently and effectively
• Taking the pain out of impact tracking

Session 3: In-depth sessions

Choose 2 out of the following:
• Working with policy-makers: a relational approach
• The digital academic: generating impact online
• Designing and facilitating meetings and workshops with stakeholders and publics

Everyone who attends gets up to 2 sessions with Mark and written feedback on a document of their
choice based on what they learned from the session. To book your session contact his PA Madie:

To book your place, please complete the form:

Fast track the impact of your research

Fields marked with an * are required
This session will give you everything you need to generate real-world impacts from your PhD. You will leave with practical tools you can use immediately in your research, whatever your discipline and career stage. The training is based on the latest research evidence and takes a unique relational approach to deliver wide-reaching and lasting impacts. As part of the session you will receive a copy of the acclaimed The Research Impact Handbook (275 pages) for future reference, and you will have the opportunity to sign up for follow-up support from Prof Reed.
Key benefits:
  • Learn about evidence-based principles for delivering research impact when you don’t have much time
  • Be challenged to think critically about how you plan for, track and report impacts
  • Discover easy and quick-to-use templates you can use immediately to:
    • Prioritise which stakeholders and publics to engage with first
    • Create a powerful impact plan that will guarantee your research makes a difference without wasting your time
    • Take the pain out of impact tracking
You will also have the option to explore a number of topics in-depth:
  • Make your digital footprint work for you, to build visibility and credibility for your research online. Understand the power and the pitfalls of using social media professionally, and find out how to become influential and drive research impacts in this space (suitable for experts, novices and those who have never used social media professionally)
  • Learn techniques you can use to design and facilitate meetings with research partners and the likely users of your research, so you are able to manage challenging people and situations, and make events efficient and enjoyable
  • Learn how to get your research into policy, wherever you work in the world, by building trust, working with intermediaries and designing effective policy briefs that you can use with the people you come into relationship with
About the trainer
Prof Mark Reed is a recognized international expert in impact research with >150 publications that have been cited >11,000 times. He has won awards for the impact of his work as the HEFCE N8 Chair of Socio-Technical Innovation at Newcastle University and Research Manager for an international charity.
Fast Track Impact is an international training company working in the Higher Education and research and innovation sectors. Our mission is to change the way researchers generate and share knowledge, so that their ideas can change the world.
Jun
27
Wed
Making Sense of Coercive Control Conference @ County South Private Dining Rooms, Lancaster University
Jun 27 @ 10:30 am – 4:15 pm

‘Making Sense of Coercive Control’, to be held at Lancaster University on Wednesday 27th June 2018. This N8 funded conference will be of particular interest to practitioners and scholars, interested in exploring police responses to and understandings of coercive control. The conference will showcase the findings of the N8 funded project, ‘Police responses to coercive control’ and discuss the ongoing developments of the ‘coercive control learning tool’, designed to support police officers in practice. We are delighted to announce that the keynote speakers are Dame Vera Baird, Police and Crime Commissioner Northumbria and Professor Sylvia Walby, OBE. There are limited places for this event, so if you are interested in attending, we suggest that you register as soon as possible. If you are no longer able to attend, please get in touch with the conference organisers so that your place can be made available to others.

10.30am            Registration and arrival

11.00-11.15        Conference Opening

11.15-12.00       Keynote: Dame Vera Baird, Police and Crime Commissioner Northumbria Police

12.00 -12.45     Overview of ‘Police responses to coercive control’ project findings

12.45-1.45         Lunch

1.45-2.30          Keynote: Professor Sylvia Walby, OBE.

2.30-2.45         Coffee/ tea break

2.45-3.45         Coercive control ‘learning tool’ showcase and group discussion

3.45-4.15          Policing coercive control: Moving forward

Project team: Dr Charlotte Barlow (Principal Investigator), Professor Sandra Walklate (Co-investigator), Dr Kelly Johnson (Research Associate), Merseyside Police (policing partner), Dr Les Humphreys, Professor Stuart Kirby and Women’s Aid (project advisors).

Further information about the conference and details of how to register are found in the attached. If you have any queries, please email Dr Charlotte Barlow